; Amanda Seyfried Apologizes For Thin-Shaming Arielle Charnas | Betches

Amanda Seyfried Apologizes For Thin-Shaming Arielle Charnas

Yesterday, the influencer world and regular world alike were set ablaze when Amanda Seyfried came for (full, not semi) influencer Arielle Charnas in an Instagram post that shamed her for “promoting an unhealthy body image”, among other things. I did a pretty extensive writeup here, so you should read that first if you’re not already up to date on what went down, but basically: Arielle Charnas posted a bikini pic, Amanda Seyfried’s friend came for her in the comments for not acknowledging all the help she has (nannies, workouts) to get the way she looks, she and Amanda got blocked, and then Amanda screen shotted that comment and put it on her feed.

And if you think the internet was on Amanda’s side, think again. Fans quickly came for her and accused her of bullying and body-shaming. Amanda initially posted what seemed to be an acknowledgment of the criticism she was receiving, which essentially just doubled down on her point and attempted to end the discussion.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

Goodnight, all, and thanks for a much needed discussion. I’m tired! ?

A post shared by Amanda Seyfried (@mingey) on

Before I dive into this, I’ve just got to ask: Can anyone tell me wtf “mingey” is???

Ok, onto the real stuff. Amanda’s whole position basically boiled down to: “if you’re going to be an influencer and take advantage of things like trainers, nutritionists, etc., and promote your ‘healthy’ lifestyle, you need to be upfront about those things.” Which is all fine and good and true, but was not at all apt for a post that was 1) not promoting anything and 2) made by someone who pretty regularly does shout-out her trainer on her Instagram (I am told). Amanda’s follow-up post, in Instagram language, means “I’m done talking about this, so goodnight”.

But that was two days ago, before mainstream media outlets picked up on the whole exchange. Getting heat from commenters and writers such as yours truly for coming after someone simply for being proud of their thin body, Amanda took to Instagram to apologize again—this time, directly addressing the issue.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

To all who feel bullied or thin-shamed during our recent social media discussion: If you know me or are familiar with any of my beliefs or stances you’ll recognize that it isn’t in my character to tear down anyone for “being who they are”. Each of us has the ability and the freedom to say and do as we choose. However, as I’m acutely aware, there’s a price tag for the group of people who find themselves with a platform to stand on. You have to be aware of the message you’re sending and be able to back it up when faced with criticism (not just praise). Hold yourselves accountable instead of using the terms above. The only thing I’d take back is exactly how I started this debate. I desperately wish it hadn’t targeted (or blasted) one person (there are MANY who engage in this questionable messaging) and instead started a cleaner, general conversation. No one needs to tear anyone apart. And I regret that it’s present right now. To the lady in question: I’m sorry for the truly negative feels you’ve endured because of this. Aside from the messy detour? The bigger, important message seems to filtering through and helping a lot of women feel supported. And that’s the name of the game.

A post shared by Amanda Seyfried (@mingey) on

She wrote in her caption, “To all who feel bullied or thin-shamed during our recent social media discussion: If you know me or are familiar with any of my beliefs or stances you’ll recognize that it isn’t in my character to tear down anyone for ‘being who they are’. Each of us has the ability and the freedom to say and do as we choose. However, as I’m acutely aware, there’s a price tag for the group of people who find themselves with a platform to stand on. You have to be aware of the message you’re sending and be able to back it up when faced with criticism (not just praise). Hold yourselves accountable instead of using the terms above.”

She continued, “The only thing I’d take back is exactly how I started this debate. I desperately wish it hadn’t targeted (or blasted) one person (there are MANY who engage in this questionable messaging) and instead started a cleaner, general conversation. No one needs to tear anyone apart. And I regret that it’s present right now. To the lady in question: I’m sorry for the truly negative feels you’ve endured because of this.”

The caption concluded, “Aside from the messy detour? The bigger, important message seems to filtering through and helping a lot of women feel supported. And that’s the name of the game.”

I mean, okay. I’m not particularly an avid fan of either Arielle Charnas or Amanda Seyfried, so I have no real skin in this game, but this is a classic non-apology if I’ve ever seen one. Yes, I’m going to be that guy. Number one, the post essentially starts off as “anyone who knows me knows I’m not known for doing the thing I was just accused of doing.” That’s not really how good apologies begin. Number two, and maybe I’m just overanalyzing here, but she seems to shade Arielle again for blocking her and her friend, by saying, “You have to be aware of the message you’re sending and be able to back it up when faced with criticism (not just praise).” Then again, you could easily read that as Amanda herself acknowledging that she needs to be able to back up her own statements when faced with criticism, as she just was.

The last point I take issue with? “I’m sorry for the truly negative feels you’ve endured because of this.” TRULY NEGATIVE FEELS? First of all, infantilizing much? Second of all, Amanda completely distances herself from the so-called “negative feels” that she caused by publicly slamming Arielle in the first place! And that’s why I got an English degree.

Amanda’s correct that we do need to have a conversation about transparency on Instagram and in general, and she’s also right that this particular photo was not the vehicle with which to initiate that debate. So, that’s cool. In any case, this feud is effectively squashed. Arielle posted a few stories when the posts first went up, her husband posted a rebuttal yesterday, but other than that, this seems pretty much over. Is this the best apology I’ve seen? No, but it’s not the worst. But, I gotta be honest, my immediate thought when reading it was that this caption more or less translates to:

Gretchen weiners, can't help it that i'm popular

Images: mingey (2), ariellecharnas / Instagram; Giphy; Shutterstock