5 Random Things To Know About Rhinoplasty

Rhinoplasty, more commonly known as a “nose job,” is probably the most infamous form of plastic surgery. From rich teenagers getting them as a sweet sixteen gift to celebrities getting them done under the guise of a “deviated septum” (looking at you, Jax Taylor) it’s a relatively common practice. When it comes to nose jobs, you probably know someone who has had one, have had one yourself, have thought about getting one, or know someone who has thought about getting one. They’re pretty common—a recent statistic found 225,000 Americans are getting rhinoplasty each year. Since this procedure is so prevalent, we consulted with Dr. Yael Halaas—a double board certified plastic surgeon and expert in facial cosmetic and reconstructive surgery, along with non-surgical procedures—to give us some more insight on the popular procedure.

1. It Might Not Be Ideal For Deviated Septums

This is often a rhinoplasty patient’s go-to excuse for getting a nose job. But nowadays, that excuse is so unbelievable that you’re honestly just better off admitting you’re getting a nose job solely for aesthetic reasons. And like, more power to you for doing so! It’s also way more #relatable. Not to mention that, according to Dr. Halaas, “Most deviated septums are inside the nose and can be corrected without changing the appearance of one’s nose.” However, Dr. Halaas adds, “If the deviation affects all the way to the bottom of your nose, or makes the outside appearance of your nose look crooked, then you need the full rhinoplasty as well.”

2. Your Doctor Will “Pack” Your Nose

Do you remember that scene from She’s The Man where Channing Tatum sticks a tampon up his nose? Yeah, well that’s pretty much the less clinical equivalent of “packing the nose” post-rhinoplasty. “Packing the nose” is when the doctor “packs” up your nose with tampon-like sterile cotton or gauze after the procedure. It can then be removed from the nose 24 hours later, although, according to Dr. Halaas, “not everyone needs them!” So fingers crossed you’re one of the lucky ones!

3. You Should Wear Your Cast

According to Dr. Halaas, “Most surgeons have you wear the cast for a week after surgery. Ask to keep your cast, and use it to wear under sunglasses or your regular eyeglasses for the whole month after surgery to keep your nasal bones in good position during the healing process.” Makes total sense and, if you already went through this whole process to have your new cute perfect nose, you might as well go the extra mile to ensure it heals seamlessly.

4. It Can Fix Sinus Conditions

If you are actually in the market for a rhinoplasty then, fun fact, you can actually correct your sinus issues simultaneously with the procedure! Dr. Halaas informed me, “Many top nasal surgeons are ENTs, board certified otolaryngologists, so they can evaluate and surgically correct sinus or breathing conditions at the same time as your rhinoplasty.” I mean, if you ask me, seems like might as well nix your Claritin addiction while getting your new perfect nose, like, why the hell not?

5. There Is A Botox Alternative

If you have a nose with a droopy tip, Dr. Halaas says that Botox can actually help stop a muscle that pulls down the tip of your nose when you smile. If you’ve read my previous article on Botox for my jaw issues, then you know I’m a personal testimony to the amazing powers of this popular beauty procedure. I’m not a doctor, but I love what it did for my jaw (and my forehead) so I don’t see why it couldn’t help your nose, too. I’m also personally fascinated by all the cool sh*t doctors can do to correct issues with non-surgical procedures. I follow like, all the LA doctors on Instagram, and they perform various non-surgical alternatives to rhinoplasty. What a world we live in. Bottom line is there are a number of ways to address issues you may be having with your nose, so be sure to discuss with your doctor all your options.

There are probably about a billion more things you should ask your doctor if you’re considering rhinoplasty, but these five are a good start. When it comes to your looks and/or breathing, do whatever is going to make you feel your best—it’s cliche, but true.

Images: @krivitskiy / Unsplash;